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Why we need ‘sex awareness’ for our children

For a long time, talking about sex especially in front of children has been considered as a taboo. Questions that were asked by children like – where do children come from? Was always brushed off or given a wrong answer all together. Some parents could give answers such as: they were bought from the hospital, an aeroplane brought the baby and many more. How was your community responding to this queries? Kindly let’s know by commenting.

This behaviour has kept the children naive until their world was engulfed with online stuff. Here, they can get all the answers they want though some have been so misleading. Some children have gone further by practising what they see on social media. Others got influenced by peers or celebrities.

No matter how we denie them access to information, there is always a way out.

So, what next? It is good to let them know what to expect from their surrounding may it physical or virtual and the consequences of getting involved with some stuff.

Though they say ignorance has no defense, some of these children get to the traps unknowingly. This attitude of hiding the real life to them is getting them off guard. Having nothing they can use to their defense not even little knowledge on what would happen to them incase they find themselves in trouble.

Unfortunately, our keeping quiet does not make them not to try out what they watch and see online or in social media. I feel it is important we educate them on some issues. Here I am having a talk on sexual misuse explaining why and when not to get involved.

On sex relationship with relatives and animals, it has been happening and it’s time we call a spade a spade. Let’s put everything in black and white. We should not continue hiding our heads in the sand while our young ones are drowning. When these issues are reported by media, we tend to ignore but the truth is our children are getting notes out of them.

I felt there is a need to sensitize them through the video…watch, like and share them to Help me reach more of them.

For more on teenage life and parenting, visit my previous posts here.

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Teenage Boy Steals Father’s Car, Kills 3 People -operanewsapp

https://www.operanewsapp.com/detail/65a4952e9f9722f5324d51a80277d3c0-teenage-boy-steals-father-s-car-kills-3-people

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10 things every teenage girl should know – Ciscasquapro

As narrated by (Nancy)

1. You are valuable standing alone! I wasted so much time during my teen years focusing on guys! I felt insignificant and alone without their attention. I wish I would have known that my value is something that I choose to believe in– not something someone gives me. Girls, you are amazing, beautiful, and special right here, right now, just as you are. Don’t ever give in to the pressure to use your body, your words, or your actions in a compromising way just to get his attention. You are enough. Learn to believe that now, because that truth will change your entire life!

2. How you dress will attract a certain kind of guy. I know you get it girls- we all want to catch their eye don’t we? But what we don’t always realize is that when you catch a guy with your body, you’ll have to keep him with your body. There is so much more about who you are than the size of your boobs or the size of your waist. Learn to respect yourself, and accentuate the beauty of your heart, your mind, and your spirit. Because those are exactly the kind of things that will snag a really good man.

3. Your parents might not always get it, but they usually know what’s good for you. I know it’s hard to believe now, because it seems like they are so far removed from what you’re going through, but one thing I wish I would have done during my teen years is actually pay more attention to what my parents were saying. They knew me and loved me better than I even knew and loved myself, and the limits they set were almost always for my good. Now that I have children, I see that more than I ever could have imagined. I wish I would have trusted them more.

4. Hang in there; no matter how bad it feels right now, it will pass. If you thought the last lesson was hard to believe, this one’s even harder. I get it –that breakup, those betraying friends, the gossip that’s going around about you– can feel like the most devastating things in the moment. But as hard as they are, and as bad as you may feel, believe me: IT WILL PASS. Don’t be afraid to cry out for help, to talk to someone you love, and to reach out. But always remember that you are strong, you are capable, and you will get through this. Don’t give it the power to ruin your life.

5. You teach people how they are allowed to treat you. I have to admit, I’m still learning this one at times. But the truth is, you have more control than you could even imagine. You are allowed to walk away, to distance yourself, and to put a stop to those people who are treating you poorly. Teach people how they can treat you, by setting your standards high. You owe it to yourself.

6. Don’t care so much about what people think. It’s easy to place our value in what people think of us, but we’ll find ourselves on a never-ending emotional roller coaster when we realize we will never, ever make everyone happy. Love life, make good choices, do the right thing, and always live for an audience of One.

7. The road less traveled is usually the right one. I remember saying NO to so many things that everyone else seemed to be saying YES to. I can’t even tell you how hard that was at times, and how much I wanted to give in to that pressure. But now that I’m here, I look back and I can’t even thank God enough for helping me choose the road less traveled, and making good choices even when it was hard. Just because everyone’s doing it, doesn’t mean it’s good. I’m glad I didn’t have to learn that the hard way.

8. Your body doesn’t define you–you define yourself. Teen or not, this is something we wrestle with as girls on and off throughout our lives. But the truth is, we can’t let our bodies define us, because we have the power to define ourselves. Take the time to love yourself, to focus on your strengths, and to be grateful for the body God has given you. And then remember: You are the daughter of A King – live like it!

9. Be yourself, because everyone else is already taken. I remember trying so hard to fit in to places and people that I was never meant to fit. It took a while to find myself after losing myself in the crowd of everyone I was trying to be. But I finally learned to embrace myself, love my personality, and appreciate my quirks. God made you special just the way you are- so be yourself.

10. God has an amazing plan for your life, but it’s up to you to choose it. I think it’s easy to forget that good things can really happen. It’s easy to be filled with fears and worries in the moment, and doubt God’s great plans and purpose for our life. Sometimes we settle for an okay life, because we don’t believe there’s something better. But beautiful girls, you are destined for great things! Believe it, and then live it…

Want to know more on teenagers and relationship? Read and other posts too… teenagers , pregnancy , others

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Teenagers’ relationships: when and how to talk about it – Ciscas

Romantic relationships are a major developmental milestone. They come with all the other changes going on during adolescence – physical, social and emotional. And they’re linked to your child’s growing interest in body image and looks, independence and privacy. The idea that your child might have these kinds of feelings can sometimes be a bit confronting for you. But these feelings are leading your child towards a deeper capacity to care, share and develop intimate relationships.

When teenage relationships start

There isn’t a ‘right age’ to start having relationships – every child is different, and every family will feel differently about this issue. But here are some averages:

  • From 9-11 years, your child might start to show more independence from your family and more interest in friends.
  • From 10-14 years, your child might want to spend more time in mixed gender groups, which might eventually end up in a romantic relationship.
  • From 15-19 years, romantic relationships can become central to social life. Friendships might become deeper and more stable.

Many teenagers spend a lot of time thinking and talking about being in a relationship. In these years, teenage relationships might last only a few weeks or months. It’s also normal for children to have no interest in romantic relationships until their late teens. Some choose to focus on schoolwork, sport or other interests.

Early teenage relationships

Younger teenagers usually hang out together in groups. If the person your child is interested in is older or younger, it could be worth mentioning that people of different ages might want different things from relationships.The most influential role models for teenagers are the grown-ups . Just talking about both men and women respectfully lets your child know you think everyone is equal and valuable.

Talking about teenage relationships with your child

Your family plays a big part in the way your child thinks about teenage relationships.

When you encourage conversations about feelings, friendships and family relationships, it can help your child feel confident to talk about teenage relationships in general. If your child knows what respectful relationships look like in general, she can relate this directly to romantic relationships.

These conversations might mean that your child will feel more comfortable sharing his feelings with you as he starts to get romantically interested in others. And the conversations can also bring up other important topics, like treating other people kindly, breaking up kindly and respecting other people’s boundaries.

Having conversations with your child about sex and relationships from a young age might mean your child feels more comfortable to ask you questions as she moves into adolescence.

In some ways, talking about romantic and/or sexual teenage relationships is like talking about friendships or going to a party. Depending on your values and family rules, you and your child might need to discuss behaviour and ground rules, and consequences for breaking the rules. For example, you might talk about how much time your child spends with his girlfriend or boyfriend versus how much time he spends studying, or whether it’s OK for his girlfriend or boyfriend to stay over.

You might also want to agree on some strategies for what your child should do if she feels unsafe or threatened.

Young people might also talk to their friends, which is healthy and normal. They still need your back-up, though, so keeping the lines of communication open is important.

Sex and teenage relationships

If your child is in a relationship, it can bring up questions about sex and intimacy.

Not all teenage relationships include sex, but most teenagers will experiment with sexual behaviour at some stage. This is why your child need information on sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

This could also be your chance to talk together about dealing with unwanted sexual and peer pressure. If you keep the lines of communication open and let your child know that you’re there to listen, he’ll be more likely to come to you with questions and concerns.

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What is happening to the girl child

#mylifeinthevillage #readers #staysafe #teenagepregnancy #WHO #youtube Africa Animals Blog Business Challenges Child Children Corona Corona virus Covid 19 Covid 19 updates Education Fathers Friends Holidays Home Hospital kenya learn Life Lifestyle Market Money Mothers Nairobi News pandemic Parent Parenting Parents Readers Schools students Success Teenage girls Teenagers Teenagers and technology virus Women

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Educate a girl and you have educated the whole nation.